3.31.2007

Salzman's AEB defending Hugo Chavez?

This article is posted here as supplemental background material. For discussion and more information visit watchpaul.blogspot.com.
***
Are you nuts?

In a message dated 3/29/2007 12:25:01 PM Pacific Daylight Time, salzman@inreach.com writes:

For those of you who read the editorial in the Times Standard on Hugo Chavez, by Rhonda Chriss Lokeman of the Kansas City Star, here are responses posted by her readers on the Star's website: www.kcstar.com
-
You can read her editorial here:
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/columnists/rhonda_chriss_lokeman/16962297.htm

----
http://pod01.prospero.com/n/pfx/forum.aspx?msg=1276&nav=messages&webtag=kr-kctm

3/25/2007 4:01 PM
With all due respect--i.e. NONE--I don't believe a word of this. Lady, you don't know a caudillo when you see one, because you're not seeing one--at least not where you should be. You're seeing a massive projection from your own feverish subconscious, and a very poorly constructed, unoriginal one at that. Chavez as Voldemort? What a joke! Chavez's landslide victories in Venezuela are the result of a clean election; ask Jimmy Carter. They are also the product of trust, not fear, and improvement, not decline! His policies are working; why do you think he got re-elected? Because he threw money around? No, because he put it back into his country, instead of taking it all away to Miami like his tame, corrupt predecessors did. Call them crazy, but ordinary Venezuelans like having free, public healthcare and education for a change. Not to mention infrastructure, housing, and more of a say over how their country is being run, all of which and more he is using his law decrees and all that evil, evil oil money to provide. Can YOUR president do that?
I don't believe you really have been outside your own country; you parrot the smug attitudes of its leadership perfectly. You want to know who the really bully is? It's Bush, and you're NOT standing up to him. Chavez is, and people are responding to that. Next time, do your homework, have the courage to go down there and see for yourself what's really going on, and don't just write whatever the State Dept. tells you to.
Posted by: No Thanks!

3/26/2007 12:43 PM
It seems that you haven't travel that much. People that follow our President do not do that out of fear. Bully?, who can talk about bully?, go and say that to the poor people that for the first time their children have a doctor. You do not have to tell us who the bully is, we know him; I cried in front of the bully when my child was a baby and was ill, but I did not have money to take him to the doctor, and a man that was a veterinarian student told me to give my four months baby half aspirin with pepsi. Mrs. Rhonda, you do not know our pain, the poverty that has been our bully for long time, so please use your colum to say some truth about my country and our President,and the people that follow him out of respect and hope. You are very welcome to visit my country, you may go to my mother's house and listen her and the other ladies that are very happy to konw that they have rights,and that they know there is a little book named Constitution that has their/our rights, and do y
ou know how they know that?, it is because Chvez taught us about it. After they knew how to read and write, they know how to find the rights that protect them from the real bully: besides poverty, lies like the ones in your colum. Where is the bully coming from?, answer this question to yourself. I hope that in your answer and thoughts, you do not bring the word populism in the way is used lately about our President. Venezuelan people, the poor ones, know a demagogic or populist politician because they were Presidents for forty years, and they are the parents of the bully in Venezuela. Ask who they are, and about their "friends" kings of bullies.
Posted by: Negda Leon

3/26/2007 2:03 PM
Chavez' power actually comes from his links with the poor majority - he backs them and they back him. That's why columnists like this right-wing ratbag hate him and slander him.
Posted by: Richard Cheeseman

3/26/2007 7:58 PM
Rhonda,
A king granted huge land favors to lords hundreds of years ago in Venezuela. Is that capitolism? The indigenous people who lived there then had that much less land to work and prosper on. It was wrong then and even more wrong today. To try and hang the label communist on Hugo because he is correcting huge mistakes of the past, is so shortsighted that I fear journalists who support this line of thinking, may just walk off a cliff. Was it capitolism when in early america that Manhattan Island was bought with a box full of trinkets from the indians? I believe in capitolism, but just because it is capitalistic doesn't mean it is right or fair. That is why there are laws to define what people can do in a capitalistic society. The lack of fair laws in Venezuela allowed the transfer of too much wealth to the few. It is not a crime or against capitalism to correct greed/Capitalism of the past. A look at history shows us that when the privileged own it all, is when a Revolution will b
ring it all to an end, with heads rolling. It is actually a favor to the rich of Venezuela to correct the problem before the fat cats heads roll. I can't say that everything about Hugo Chavez is perfect, but I see free education, health care, a chance to work the land, as a huge improvement to what unrestrained Capitolism brought them.
Posted by: Jim Blevins

3/26/2007 10:58 PM
I hope you read the comments that readers have sent in response to your article VERY carefully, and read them many times over. Your readers comments are very intelligent and insightful, whereas your article is offensive nonsense that you need to apologize for writing and publishing. How DARE you call Chavez a dictator!!?? Look at the facts. His opposing candidate acknowledged that he won the last democratic election fairly. And the fact is, the man you refer to as your fearless leader (maybe yours, but certainly not mine) STOLE the election fraudulently. And that is only for starters. I don't have time to go through all the ridiculous flaws in your article. I hope I can make time at a later date. But you need to do your homework. You should be ashamed of yourself. You call yourself a journalist??!! How pathetic. Hey, are you a coward or are you going to write a column in response to all these readers criticism of your Orwellian article?? We will see, won't we?
Posted by: David Parker

Comments
Chaves is working for the poor people in the region and many arround the world. Please let Hugo help those who need his help.Why are you portraying him like that while you all know that when Bush is using guns and bombs to kill, Chavez is helping with oil revenues so what?
Posted by: Maliga

3/26/2007 10:06 AM
Simply, you present no evidence for your accusations.
Posted by: Steven Goetz

3/26/2007 11:36 AM
It's too bad you don't read before you write. Unfortunately, Chavez is an important and complex figure who is turning the globe in a different direction -- and we readers need clarification not silly hyperbole. You do your readers a disservice by simplifying what's clearly out of your range. You need to go back & do your homework.
Posted by: Professor M
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3.30.2007

More screed from the "Alliance for Ethical Business"

This blog is just a supplement (a bibliography) to watchpaul - to see what this is about, click on over to watchpaul, see what is wrong with Richard Salzman and his phony organizations... he's not asking for money on this one - YET...

In a message dated 1/26/2007 1:03:30 PM Pacific Standard Time, aeb@inreach.com writes:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carl-pope/pirates-north-of-the-klam_b_39274.html

Pirates North [sic] of the Klamath

Scotia, CA -- The announcement that Pacific Lumber (PL) would attempt to escape the regulatory authority of the State of California by heading for bankruptcy court http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/16502865.htm brought back bitter memories.

PL was paid enormous sums by the federal government for the protection of the Headwaters Forest but never accepted the fact that being a good environmental steward was part of the deal.

Indeed, the purchase almost fell apart at the last minute when PL and then-Governor Pete Wilson attempted to weaken this requirement. Fortunately, the Majority Leader of the California Senate, John Burton, held firm and, in the last hour of the legislative session, told PL that if it insisted on weakening environmental standards, it would have to kiss a half billion in federal and state tax dollars good-bye. PL blinked.

Now the outlaw is back, asking a federal bankruptcy court to release it from the requirement that it comply with California's water quality standards. The latest shenanigans comes as the company filed for, "Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, saying it is 'facing a liquidity crisis arising from regulatory limitations on timber harvest.' In a release, the company said its annual timber harvest volumes and cash flows will be below the levels needed to meet its debt service obligations." The solution? Cut more timber, even at the expense of water quality and endangered salmon runs.
This is standard operating procedure for PL, Maxxam (the holding company that controls it), and Charles Hurwitz, (the Houston Financier who manipulates it). And it's personally painful for me, because I received a phone call from a distraught PL employee the afternoon when Hurwitz first made his hostile takeover bid for Pacific Lumber, which at the time was the model of sustainable forestry in the United States. The employee explained to me back in 1985 that Hurwitz was going to take the company over, plunge it into debt, and try to pay the debt off by liquidating the remaining old growth redwoods. She wanted to know if there was a way the company could fight Hurwitz off.
I thought there was. Pacific Lumber could take the water quality and conservation benefits of its sustainable timber practices, sign a permanent commitment to them, and receive in exchange a conservation easement worth hundreds of millions to its shareholders. This conservation easement would have been good for the company, but a poison pill for Hurwitz and his plan to clearcut the Redwoods. I approached sympathetic members of the Pacific Lumber Board. At first they were interested, but asked me not to go the press. Then, at the last minute, their lawyers told them that if they stood up to Hurwitz, he would sue them personally, and they could be bankrupted -- whereas if they went along with Hurtwitz, the lawyers said, he could and would legally indemnify them against the lawsuits which followed. Faced with personal ruin, the board gave in and allowed Hurwitz to take over. Only later did we learn that the lawyers, whether correct or not, had a conflict of interest http://mult
inationalmonitor.org/hyper/issues/1994/09/mm0994_07.html -- because they were also the lawyers for leveraged buy-out king Ivan Boesky, who was, secretly, Hurwitz's partner in the hostile takeover.
I've always wondered what would have happened if I had taken our idea to the press. But now even the modest protection we won in the Headwater Deal is at risk -- because federal bankruptcy judges have become the new court of last resort for crony capitalism of the sort that Hurwitz and his fellow pirates represent. Want out of an expensive underfunded pension plan? Follow the lead of the airlines who've gone to bankruptcy court to find a way to dodge their responsibilities. Want to raise electricity rates for your customers beyond the tolerable level? Just transfer your assets to a holding company, declare bankruptcy and leave the rate-payers with the liabilities, which is what happened in California's electricity crisis. Find it awkward to clean up your toxic waste? Use the same ploy: Declare bankruptcy and walk away from your obligations to communities as ASARCO is trying to do http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/200605/goingforbroke/page1.asp .
And now the bankruptcy judges are being asked to rule that Pacific Lumber can cut trees because it needs to pay off its junk bond debt. Yes, this stands the concept of the rule of law on its head -- but we live in a topsy-turvy world. I'm not sure they can't get away with it -- unless Congress fixes federal bankruptcy law fast, as Senator Maria Cantwell proposed last year http://www.sierraclub.org/carlpope/2006/04/morally-bankrupt-bankruptcy-law.asp .

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From Salzman's "AEB" aka "Redwood Progressive" aka "Richard's List" aka....

All this call to action crap - Salzman doesn't even know that there are Settlement Negotiations ongoing, possibly nearing completion - he just want more drama, more cause to line the activist coffers. Get a life.

In a message dated 11/15/2006 12:43:16 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, aebmail@cox.net writes:

Show FERC (and tell FERC) that the public won't stand for fifty more years of damage--come to FERC's public hearing on Thursday November 16 at 7 p.m. at Eureka Red Lion Hotel. The NEC, Klamath Tribes, commercial fishing groups, water quality watchdogs and others will provide information about the dams and the DEIS across the hall. Get informed, then fill FERC's record with what needs to be reflected in its final EIS.

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http://www.times-standard.com/local/ci_4662498

County leaders advocate Klamath dam removal
John Driscoll/The Times-Standard
Eureka Times Standard
11/15/2006

Humboldt County supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday in favor of removing four of the Klamath River's dams, riding what many say is a wave of public opinion and political will toward restoring salmon runs and economies on the river.

The resolution comes as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hears communities' concerns about the continued operation of the hydropower dams. The agency, which will decide whether to issue Pacificorp a new 50-year license, has not considered removing the dams as a viable option.

But several key developments recently have provided momentum toward such an end. Pacificorp lost an administrative hearing challenging federal fisheries agencies' orders to build expensive fish ladders over the dams. A bond measure just passed by voters holds millions that could be used for restoring the Klamath. California Coastal Conservancy studies have found the cost of dam decommissioning relatively low, and also found few toxins in sediment trapped behind the dams.

”This is really the Berlin Wall of fisheries issues on the North Coast,” Tom Weseloh of California Trout told the board.

Several speakers said the amount of electricity the dams produce isn't worth the damage done by the dams. The dams block several hundred miles of potential spawning habitat for salmon. Fisheries biologist Pat Higgins said the reservoirs also pollute the river by prompting toxic algae blooms, which can also be dangerous to people.

FERC is holding a public hearing on its draft environmental impact statement on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Red Lion Inn in Eureka.

Pacificorp has lodged its own solution to getting fish around the dams by trapping them and trucking them up above Upper Klamath Lake, then doing the same for young fish getting ready to migrate downstream. Ross Taylor, a McKinleyville fisheries biologist, said that trapping and trucking programs have been a failure on the Columbia River, and won't work on the Klamath either.

It also doesn't address water quality problems on the river, said Erica Terence with the Northcoast Environmental Center.

”These dams present a massive obstacle to improving water quality,” Terence said.

Fifth District Supervisor Jill Geist said that removal of the dams will help salmon and upstream economies, and that the loss of power generation will be made up with a planned large natural gas power plant in the region. It's also become clear that the dams do not play much of a role in flood control, she said. Available bond money and political support from both California and Oregon's governors are critical.

”Now is the time,” Geist said.

The board voted 4-0 in support of the resolution. Supervisor Bonnie Neely was absent.

----

Begin forwarded message:

From: Erica Terence
Date: November 8, 2006 6:56:12 PM PST
Subject: How YOU can help UNDAM the KLAMATH--teach-in this Friday, public hearing next Thursday

To anyone who cares about the Klamath River,

You can play a vital role before December 1 in getting the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to remove the Klamath River dams. HERE'S HOW YOU CAN HELP:

1--Come to the teach-in this Friday at 6 p.m. at the Northcoast Environmental Center ( 575 H St. Arcata) and ask a lot of questions of the knowledgeable folks who will be on hand to talk about the Klamath and FERC's Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) on the Klamath dams, which proposes trapping fish, radio tagging them and driving them around the dams. Craig Tucker of the Karuk Tribe, fisheries biologist Pat Higgins and river restoration advocate Petey Brucker are featured speakers for the evening. The new film "Solving the Klamath Crisis: Keeping Farms and Fish Alive, " produced by the Klamath Salmon Media Collaborative, also will be shown. Talking points, a sample letter, and letter-writing materials will be available for the public at this event, as will free food and drink.

2--Show FERC (and tell FERC) that the public won't stand for fifty more years of damage--come to FERC's public hearing on Thursday November 16 at 7 p.m. at Eureka Red Lion Hotel. The NEC, Klamath Tribes, commercial fishing groups, water quality watchdogs and others will provide information about the dams and the DEIS across the hall. Get informed, then fill FERC's record with what needs to be reflected in its final EIS.

3--Write a letter on your own! Tell FERC that its DEIS is legally inadequate and biologically insupportable. The document fails to analyze removal of four dams, fails to acknowledge the importance of salmon as a cultural resource and fails to put forward any meaningful changes that would bring about real river restoration. The DEIS also makes no mention of the sediment study done by the California Coastal Conservancy which showed that sediments behind the dams don't contain toxins and can cheaply be flushed out or removed. Written comments will be received until Thursday, December 1. See the attached talking points, sample letter:
Comments will be received until November 24, 2006, and should be clearly marked “For Docket No. P-2082-027 (Klamath)” and mailed to: Magalie R. Salas, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First St. NE, Washington DC 20426.

Please forward this to others who may be interested. Thank you!




Why The Klamath Dams Should Come Out





1- Fish need cold, clean water with lots of oxygen in it, but Iron Gate dam, Copco I dam, Copco II dam and J.C. Boyle dam heat up water in the Klamath River to lethal temperatures during the hottest parts of the year and deplete oxygen supplies fish need to survive. 


2- Overheated and oxygen deficient waters provide prime conditions for toxic algae to bloom in the reservoirs behind the dams at levels now thousands of times higher than what the World Health Organization says is safe to ingest. Some of this algae, called microcystis aeruginosa, can cause severe liver damage and other serious health problems in both humans and fish.


3- Hundreds of miles of historic spawning grounds would be re-opened to Klamath River salmon whose numbers now run dangerously close to extinction. Klamath salmon runs were so small this year that regulators closed ocean fishing almost completely along 700 miles of coast, starving commercial fishing communities of an estimated $100 million and shorting Tribes of a resource traditionally used for both subsistence and ceremonies. Damage to salmon fisheries far outweighs any benefits of power production. Unless these dams are dealt with, more fishery closures are inevitable.


4- The dams block the natural functions of the river, impoverish its spawning gravel for 50 miles downstream, and reduce the impact of natural flushing flows that in the past scoured out and reduced fish parasites and algae and kept riparian areas healthy.


5- To survive, tribes and other fishermen need fish that depend on cold clean water, healthy habitat and fewer turbines. Fish feeds culture and fills bellies. These fish would do much better with access to more of their old habitat.


6- The turbines on the dams in question operate at less than half capacity, and generate only 2 % of PacifiCorp’s overall power. In fact, the company recently admitted that it operates the hydroelectric projects on the dams for compliance, rather than for maximum profit or energy output. The power ratepayers get from those turbines could be replaced using alternative energy sources such as wind and solar equipment.


7- The Klamath dams that need to be removed are not used for irrigation and are not designed for flood control. Farmers will still get their water from behind Keno and Link dams, which are small enough barriers for fish to pass by using normal ladders.


8- Removing the dams from the river would go a long way towards restoring the Klamath River, restoring its fishing-dependent communities, and reversing decades of damage and disruption.

---
Comments will be received until November 24, 2006, and should be clearly marked “For Docket No. P-2082-027 (Klamath)” and mailed to: Magalie R. Salas, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First St. NE, Washington DC 20426.
-----

What’s Wrong With FERC’s Klamath Dams DEIS

1- FERC’s DEIS only analyzes removal of two dams, and fails to consider an alternative in which four dams—Iron Gate, Copco I, Copco II, J.C. Boyle—would be decommissioned, as recommended by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, The Pacific Fisheries Management Council and many others. The failure to analyze a four-dam removal scenario makes a mockery of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) disclosure requirements and does not give a full range of alternatives as required by law.

2- FERC’s favored staff alternative would trap chinook salmon, then drive them around the dams on trucks over highways, even though the DEIS showed that taking out two of the dams would be better for fish and water quality than their own trap-and-haul plan. What’s more, the trap and haul alternative doesn’t mitigate for degraded or blocked Lamprey, Steelhead, Sturgeon, and Coho habitat. Federal agencies, tribes and conservation groups including the Northcoast Environmental Center have criticized the staff alternative as biologically insupportable.

3- The DEIS contains no provisions to protect rate paying irrigators in the upper basin from future inflated power rates. FERC’s own analysis shows that a four-dam removal alternative would likely be many millions of dollars cheaper than the installation of fish ladders required by federal agencies. In short, dam decommissioning is the cheapest option as well as the best for PacifiCorp customers. Keeping the dams at the cost of fish ladders would force the dams to operate at a deficit that PacifiCorp would have to offset with higher power rates.

4- The DEIS is inconsistent with the legal findings of federal administrative law Judge Parlen L. McKenna, who ruled that fish will be able to recolonize above the dams if given the chance. The PacifiCorp and staff alternatives both suggest that water quality above the dams is too poor for fish to survive, and yet both propose leaving the dams in place for another fifty years when it is the dams themselves that harm water quality.

5- FERC’s DEIS fails to address the California Coastal Conservancy study showing that sediments backed up behind the dams don’t contain any toxic substances and would be cheap and safe to flush out.

6- None of the alternatives would relicense Keno dam securely under public jurisdiction. Since construction, Keno dam has always been part of the FERC license and should continue to be part of any new FERC license so that it remains under public oversight by FERC.

7- None of the alternatives address the fact that dams operated by PacifiCorp have damaged the river for almost a hundred years. The energy subsidiary owned by billionaire Warren Buffet, benefited for decades from abuse of the river, and now has a responsibility to mitigate for those damages and restore the Klamath River and its salmon.

8- The alternative that would remove Iron Gate and Copco I fails to detail a transition plan for the fish hatchery below Iron Gate dam. That hatchery will need to remain in place while fish recolonize upstream.

9- PacifiCorp and staff alternatives propose pumping supplemental oxygen through giant bubble machines into pools to help stressed and overheated fish survive—a band-aid solution at best that does not adequately address low flows, high temperatures or alarming nutrient levels that cause toxic algae blooms and diseases that kill many juvenile salmon before they reach the ocean.

Environmental costs such as the costs of degraded water quality, degraded habitat, severely depleted cultural resources and shrinking fisheries should be factored into a cost-benefit analysis in the DEIS document. Add those externalities up and the costs of leaving in place Iron Gate, Copco I, Copco II and J.C. Boyle dams will far outweigh the benefits of letting those dams continue to operate as they are. The societal benefits of removing the dams far outweigh the cost of removing those dams. Removal is the cheapest and best option—and the only option that will restore the Klamath River and its once-abundant fisheries. 

---

Sample letter

Magalie R. Salas
Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
888 First Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20426

Re: Klamath Hydroelectric Project FERC No. 2082-027


[Date]


Dear Ms. Salas,
The Klamath River is a special place that deserves protection. The Klamath was once the third most productive salmon fishery in the United States. However, after 80 years of abuse by PacifiCorp and its predecessors, the Klamath is in dire need of restoration. One key to restoring the Klamath is the removal of the lower four dams that block more than 300 miles of historic salmon spawning habitat.

FERC’s draft environmental impact statement overlooked several key issues that should be evaluated and incorporated into a final environmental impact statement to ensure a robust and complete analysis of the environmental impacts to the Klamath River.

First, FERC should follow the recommendations of Tribes, conservation groups and NOAA Fisheries to remove the four dams. FERC only evaluated removing two dams in its draft environmental impact statement. The lower four dams are where most of the problem exists. All the agencies, tribes, and other stakeholders agree that removing the lower four dams will improve water quality and open up a vast amount of habitat for salmon, steelhead, and other species.

FERC staff created their own alternative that relies on driving fish around the dams and only introducing a small, experimental population of salmon to one stretch of river. This is completely inadequate to restore healthy salmon populations to the Klamath River and ignores the requirements of federal fish agencies calling for full volitional fish passage to allow fish to swim themselves up and downstream.

Finally, FERC should consider and incorporate into the final environmental impact statement the sediment study from the California Coastal Conservancy and the ruling of the administrative law judge in the Energy Policy Act hearings. The California Coastal Conservancy conducted a study of the sediment behind the dams. This study concludes dam removal could be done safely and affordably without leading to floods or exposing the river to toxins. Further, the ruling from the administrative law judge concluded “project operations have and continue to adversely affect” river health, including the resident trout fishery and riparian habitat. He also found that the measures required by the agencies would benefit threatened coho salmon and other anadromous fish, resident trout, Pacific lamprey and riparian habitat.

Thank you for considering these comments. I hope that FERC will make appropriate changes to its final environmental impact statement and do its part to protect and restore the Klamath River.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

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aebmail@cox.net writes:

This time he uses "Redwood Progressive" - last time it ws "Richard's list - next it'll the the so-called "Alliance for Ethical Business" (all him and all part of his made-up "growing coalition" of "grassroots" groups. You're not fooling anyone anymore, Richard.

In a message dated 11/9/2006 12:18:00 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, aebmail@cox.net writes:

Begin forwarded message:

From: Erica Terence
Date: November 8, 2006 6:56:12 PM PST
Subject: How YOU can help UNDAM the KLAMATH--teach-in this Friday, public hearing next Thursday

To anyone who cares about the Klamath River,

You can play a vital role before December 1 in getting the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to remove the Klamath River dams. HERE'S HOW YOU CAN HELP:

1--Come to the teach-in this Friday at 6 p.m. at the Northcoast Environmental Center ( 575 H St. Arcata) and ask a lot of questions of the knowledgeable folks who will be on hand to talk about the Klamath and FERC's Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) on the Klamath dams, which proposes trapping fish, radio tagging them and driving them around the dams. Craig Tucker of the Karuk Tribe, fisheries biologist Pat Higgins and river restoration advocate Petey Brucker are featured speakers for the evening. The new film "Solving the Klamath Crisis: Keeping Farms and Fish Alive, " produced by the Klamath Salmon Media Collaborative, also will be shown. Talking points, a sample letter, and letter-writing materials will be available for the public at this event, as will free food and drink.

2--Show FERC (and tell FERC) that the public won't stand for fifty more years of damage--come to FERC's public hearing on Thursday November 16 at 7 p.m. at Eureka Red Lion Hotel. The NEC, Klamath Tribes, commercial fishing groups, water quality watchdogs and others will provide information about the dams and the DEIS across the hall. Get informed, then fill FERC's record with what needs to be reflected in its final EIS.

3--Write a letter on your own! Tell FERC that its DEIS is legally inadequate and biologically insupportable. The document fails to analyze removal of four dams, fails to acknowledge the importance of salmon as a cultural resource and fails to put forward any meaningful changes that would bring about real river restoration. The DEIS also makes no mention of the sediment study done by the California Coastal Conservancy which showed that sediments behind the dams don't contain toxins and can cheaply be flushed out or removed. Written comments will be received until Thursday, December 1. See the attached talking points, sample letter:
Comments will be received until November 24, 2006, and should be clearly marked “For Docket No. P-2082-027 (Klamath)” and mailed to: Magalie R. Salas, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First St. NE, Washington DC 20426.

Please forward this to others who may be interested. Thank you!


Why The Klamath Dams Should Come Out

1- Fish need cold, clean water with lots of oxygen in it, but Iron Gate dam, Copco I dam, Copco II dam and J.C. Boyle dam heat up water in the Klamath River to lethal temperatures during the hottest parts of the year and deplete oxygen supplies fish need to survive. 

2- Overheated and oxygen deficient waters provide prime conditions for toxic algae to bloom in the reservoirs behind the dams at levels now thousands of times higher than what the World Health Organization says is safe to ingest. Some of this algae, called microcystis aeruginosa, can cause severe liver damage and other serious health problems in both humans and fish.

3- Hundreds of miles of historic spawning grounds would be re-opened to Klamath River salmon whose numbers now run dangerously close to extinction. Klamath salmon runs were so small this year that regulators closed ocean fishing almost completely along 700 miles of coast, starving commercial fishing communities of an estimated $100 million and shorting Tribes of a resource traditionally used for both subsistence and ceremonies. Damage to salmon fisheries far outweighs any benefits of power production. Unless these dams are dealt with, more fishery closures are inevitable.

4- The dams block the natural functions of the river, impoverish its spawning gravel for 50 miles downstream, and reduce the impact of natural flushing flows that in the past scoured out and reduced fish parasites and algae and kept riparian areas healthy.

5- To survive, tribes and other fishermen need fish that depend on cold clean water, healthy habitat and fewer turbines. Fish feeds culture and fills bellies. These fish would do much better with access to more of their old habitat.

6- The turbines on the dams in question operate at less than half capacity, and generate only 2 % of PacifiCorp’s overall power. In fact, the company recently admitted that it operates the hydroelectric projects on the dams for compliance, rather than for maximum profit or energy output. The power ratepayers get from those turbines could be replaced using alternative energy sources such as wind and solar equipment.

7- The Klamath dams that need to be removed are not used for irrigation and are not designed for flood control. Farmers will still get their water from behind Keno and Link dams, which are small enough barriers for fish to pass by using normal ladders.

8- Removing the dams from the river would go a long way towards restoring the Klamath River, restoring its fishing-dependent communities, and reversing decades of damage and disruption.
---
Comments will be received until November 24, 2006, and should be clearly marked “For Docket No. P-2082-027 (Klamath)” and mailed to: Magalie R. Salas, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First St. NE, Washington DC 20426.



-----

What’s Wrong With FERC’s Klamath Dams DEIS



1- FERC’s DEIS only analyzes removal of two dams, and fails to consider an alternative in which four dams—Iron Gate, Copco I, Copco II, J.C. Boyle—would be decommissioned, as recommended by the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, The Pacific Fisheries Management Council and many others. The failure to analyze a four-dam removal scenario makes a mockery of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) disclosure requirements and does not give a full range of alternatives as required by law.
2- FERC’s favored staff alternative would trap chinook salmon, then drive them around the dams on trucks over highways, even though the DEIS showed that taking out two of the dams would be better for fish and water quality than their own trap-and-haul plan. What’s more, the trap and haul alternative doesn’t mitigate for degraded or blocked Lamprey, Steelhead, Sturgeon, and Coho habitat. Federal agencies, tribes and conservation groups including the Northcoast Environmental Center have criticized the staff alternative as biologically insupportable.
3- The DEIS contains no provisions to protect rate paying irrigators in the upper basin from future inflated power rates. FERC’s own analysis shows that a four-dam removal alternative would likely be many millions of dollars cheaper than the installation of fish ladders required by federal agencies. In short, dam decommissioning is the cheapest option as well as the best for PacifiCorp customers. Keeping the dams at the cost of fish ladders would force the dams to operate at a deficit that PacifiCorp would have to offset with higher power rates.
4- The DEIS is inconsistent with the legal findings of federal administrative law Judge Parlen L. McKenna, who ruled that fish will be able to recolonize above the dams if given the chance. The PacifiCorp and staff alternatives both suggest that water quality above the dams is too poor for fish to survive, and yet both propose leaving the dams in place for another fifty years when it is the dams themselves that harm water quality.
5- FERC’s DEIS fails to address the California Coastal Conservancy study showing that sediments backed up behind the dams don’t contain any toxic substances and would be cheap and safe to flush out.
6- None of the alternatives would relicense Keno dam securely under public jurisdiction. Since construction, Keno dam has always been part of the FERC license and should continue to be part of any new FERC license so that it remains under public oversight by FERC.
7- None of the alternatives address the fact that dams operated by PacifiCorp have damaged the river for almost a hundred years. The energy subsidiary owned by billionaire Warren Buffet, benefited for decades from abuse of the river, and now has a responsibility to mitigate for those damages and restore the Klamath River and its salmon.
8- The alternative that would remove Iron Gate and Copco I fails to detail a transition plan for the fish hatchery below Iron Gate dam. That hatchery will need to remain in place while fish recolonize upstream.
9- PacifiCorp and staff alternatives propose pumping supplemental oxygen through giant bubble machines into pools to help stressed and overheated fish survive—a band-aid solution at best that does not adequately address low flows, high temperatures or alarming nutrient levels that cause toxic algae blooms and diseases that kill many juvenile salmon before they reach the ocean.
Environmental costs such as the costs of degraded water quality, degraded habitat, severely depleted cultural resources and shrinking fisheries should be factored into a cost-benefit analysis in the DEIS document. Add those externalities up and the costs of leaving in place Iron Gate, Copco I, Copco II and J.C. Boyle dams will far outweigh the benefits of letting those dams continue to operate as they are. The societal benefits of removing the dams far outweigh the cost of removing those dams. Removal is the cheapest and best option—and the only option that will restore the Klamath River and its once-abundant fisheries. 

---

Sample letter

Magalie R. Salas
Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
888 First Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20426

Re: Klamath Hydroelectric Project FERC No. 2082-027


[Date]


Dear Ms. Salas,
The Klamath River is a special place that deserves protection. The Klamath was once the third most productive salmon fishery in the United States. However, after 80 years of abuse by PacifiCorp and its predecessors, the Klamath is in dire need of restoration. One key to restoring the Klamath is the removal of the lower four dams that block more than 300 miles of historic salmon spawning habitat.

FERC’s draft environmental impact statement overlooked several key issues that should be evaluated and incorporated into a final environmental impact statement to ensure a robust and complete analysis of the environmental impacts to the Klamath River.

First, FERC should follow the recommendations of Tribes, conservation groups and NOAA Fisheries to remove the four dams. FERC only evaluated removing two dams in its draft environmental impact statement. The lower four dams are where most of the problem exists. All the agencies, tribes, and other stakeholders agree that removing the lower four dams will improve water quality and open up a vast amount of habitat for salmon, steelhead, and other species.

FERC staff created their own alternative that relies on driving fish around the dams and only introducing a small, experimental population of salmon to one stretch of river. This is completely inadequate to restore healthy salmon populations to the Klamath River and ignores the requirements of federal fish agencies calling for full volitional fish passage to allow fish to swim themselves up and downstream.

Finally, FERC should consider and incorporate into the final environmental impact statement the sediment study from the California Coastal Conservancy and the ruling of the administrative law judge in the Energy Policy Act hearings. The California Coastal Conservancy conducted a study of the sediment behind the dams. This study concludes dam removal could be done safely and affordably without leading to floods or exposing the river to toxins. Further, the ruling from the administrative law judge concluded “project operations have and continue to adversely affect” river health, including the resident trout fishery and riparian habitat. He also found that the measures required by the agencies would benefit threatened coho salmon and other anadromous fish, resident trout, Pacific lamprey and riparian habitat.

Thank you for considering these comments. I hope that FERC will make appropriate changes to its final environmental impact statement and do its part to protect and restore the Klamath River.


Sincerely,

[Your name]

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Salzman's latest "cause" - poor dumbass

Richard Salzman - the dumbass, is stirring up trouble again. (Later on he asks for money... read all connected posts.)

In a message dated 9/28/2006 10:45:59 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, salzman@inreach.com writes:

"If PacifiCorp is going to pursue the least-cost option for their customers, they should think about removing these dams,"

”It really doesn't seem to make any sense at this point for Pacificorp to keep the dams,”


HoustonChronicle.com

Sept. 28, 2006, 3:53AM
Studies: Dam Removal Helpful, Affordable

By JEFF BARNARD Associated Press Writer
© 2006 The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — Removing four hydroelectric dams from the Klamath River to help struggling salmon runs there would not be as expensive as feared, studies for a state agency show.

Indian tribes, salmon fishermen and conservation groups have been pressing Portland-based utility PacifiCorp to remove the dams to help the Klamath's struggling salmon runs. The company is seeking to continue operating the dams.

The runs were so poor this year that federal fisheries managers practically shut down commercial salmon fishing off the West Coast to protect them.

The studies for the California State Coastal Conservancy found that removing the dams will not be as expensive as first believed because sediments built up behind the dams contain very low levels of toxic leftovers from gold mining, farming and plywood manufacturing.

The studies, submitted Tuesday to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, also found that only about 5 percent of the 21 million cubic yards of sediment trapped behind the dams would wash out, and it all could be gone in one winter rainy season.

PacifiCorp is seeking a new 50-year operating license from FERC to operate the damns in southern Oregon and Northern California. The dams produce a combined 150 megawatts, enough electricity for 70,000 customers and 2 percent of PacifiCorp's production.

PacifiCorp spokesman Dave Kvamme said any decision on removing the dams will take much more study. The utility has proposed trucking salmon around the dams rather than building fish ladders or removing them.

Steve Rothert, of conservation group American Rivers, said that an economic analysis by FERC found that when mandates by federal agencies for making the dams more fish-friendly are taken into account, PacifiCorp would lose $28.7 million a year operating the dams.

"If PacifiCorp is going to pursue the least-cost option for their customers, they should think about removing these dams," he said.

Federal agencies told FERC earlier this year that PacifiCorp must install fish ladders, fish screens and reduce the amount of water diverted to turbines to help struggling returns of salmon.

However, under a new change in federal law, the utility has challenged the requirements. An administrative law judge is expected to issue a ruling this week.

-----

Now is the time for each of us to act. If you called already, call again.

Tell Pacific Corp to take down the dams.
Pacific Corp is owned by MidAmerica, a consolidated subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway.

Please call CEO, David L. Sokol. He can be reached at 515.242.4300, ask to speak to Mr. Sokol's personal secretary, Babs
or email her at: btracy@midamerican.com
or write to: David Sokol MidAmerica P.O. Box 657, Des Moines, IA 50303-0657

Make it clear that no other alternative will be acceptable. The dams on the Klamath must come down. Lets do this for the salmon and for our children and their children, and lets do this in memory of Tim McKay.

Tell him we are not going away.
--

http://www.pelicannetwork.net/krc.dammedupperbasin.htm
http://www.klamathforestalliance.org/Newsarticles/newsarticle20051207.html
http://klamathrestoration.org/wp/bring-the-salmon-home-un-dam-the-klamath/
http://www.pcffa.org/klamath.htm
http://www.friendsoftheriver.org/PressRoom/2004-07-06_FOR.html
http://www.democraticleader.house.gov/press/articles.cfm?pressReleaseID=1523

----
http://www.times-standard.com/local/ci_4409798

9/28/2006

Klamath dam removal seen as safe, cheap

John Driscoll/The Times-Standard
Eureka Times Standard

But conservancy report is disputed

Just after federal regulators proposed only minor changes for a Klamath River hydroelectric project, the California Coastal Conservancy filed a report that suggests it would be safe and relatively inexpensive to take down the four dams altogether.

The conservancy report found that some 21 million cubic yards of sediment has been trapped behind the dams, built between 1908 and the 1960s. But removing the Pacificorp dams would only release one-fifth that amount, and it could be allowed to happen naturally through erosion.

A Conservancy contractor also examined the muck for contamination, but found nearly all samples were clean.

American Indian tribes, fishermen and environmental groups, as well as California agencies, have been pressing Pacificorp and federal agencies to consider taking out the dams. They block salmon and other migrating fish from historic spawning grounds that stretched upstream of Upper Klamath Lake.

That call has gotten louder in recent years, with fisheries managers cutting quotas to protect weak runs of wild salmon, devastating commercial and tribal fishing operations this year. Water supply conflicts and Pacificorp's application for a new 50-year license to run the project also have brought the issues into the spotlight. Toxic algae blooms in the reservoirs have prompted health warnings.

The study was a “fatal flaw” analysis, said Michael Bowen with the coastal conservancy.

”The discussion about decommissioning as an alternative can now proceed in an informed fashion,” Bowen said, “and the subject of toxicity as a fatal flaw is off the table.”

But Pacificorp spokesman Dave Kvamme said the analysis isn't a comprehensive environmental review of dam removal. In fact, Pacificorp believes dam removal could have big environmental impacts on fisheries and other resources.

”A full assessment, should it ever come to that, would take years of study before any strategy could be developed,” Kvamme said.

Most of the material behinds the dams is fine clay and silt, with a smaller quantity of sand and even less gravel, the report found. If all the dams were removed within the same time frame, about 3.7 million cubic yards would be washed downstream into the ocean, most of it quickly. That amount wouldn't cause flooding, according to the report.

Since there is very little contamination of the sediment, and since it wouldn't have to be excavated, the cost of decommissioning and removing the dams may be less than $100 million. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Monday recommended that none of the dams be removed. However, it did estimate the cost of removing them to be $77 million if the sediment didn't have to be mechanically removed.

That's substantially less than the $200 million or more it's expected to cost if Pacificorp is forced to install fish ladders to allow salmon to migrate above the dams. There is still some uncertainty as to whether that will be a requirement, as an administrative law judge is mulling whether any spawning habitat exists within the project, among other issues, which may have a profound effect on the final demands.

”It really doesn't seem to make any sense at this point for Pacificorp to keep the dams,” said Steve Rothert of American Rivers.

Not everyone wants the dams to come out. Some people who live around the reservoirs say their property values and businesses would suffer if the dams were removed.

Salmon haven't been far up the Klamath for nearly 90 years, wrote Charlene Walden of Hornbrook.

”The damage was done when the dams were put in, we can't change that fact, but how can the environmentalists and the Indians justify the killing of a ecosystem here now, and the destruction of their own county,” Walden wrote. “Sorry, we all live here, it's not always about you.”
-----
Let me repeat:

Enough already.
Tell Pacific Corp to take down the dams.
Pacific Corp is owned by MidAmerica, a consolidated subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway.

Please call CEO, David L. Sokol. He can be reached at 515.242.4300, ask to speak to Mr. Sokol's personal secretary, Babs
or email her at: btracy at midamerican.com
or write to: David Sokol MidAmerica P.O. Box 657, Des Moines, IA 50303-0657

Make it clear that no other alternative will be acceptable. The dams on the Klamath must come down. Lets do this for the salmon and for our children and their children, and lets do this in memory of Tim McKay.

Tell him we are not going away.
--
http://www.pelicannetwork.net/krc.dammedupperbasin.htm
http://www.klamathforestalliance.org/Newsarticles/newsarticle20051207.html
http://klamathrestoration.org/wp/bring-the-salmon-home-un-dam-the-klamath/
http://www.pcffa.org/klamath.htm
http://www.friendsoftheriver.org/PressRoom/2004-07-06_FOR.html
http://www.democraticleader.house.gov/press/articles.cfm?pressReleaseID=1523
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***
UPDATE: This time the letter to the editor that he wrote was under his own name. Remarkable.

Send your own Buffett appeal
The Times-Standard
Article Launched: 04/24/2007 04:15:23 AM PDT

Klamath River advocates are wise to bring their plea for river restoration, through dam removal, directly to Warren Buffett and his shareholders. John Driscoll gave this story excellent coverage in his cover article of April 18, and the Times Standard wrote a compelling editorial the next day, in support of this action.

Each of us as citizens of the North Coast can further support this effort by showering Mr. Buffett with letters, e-mails and phone calls, encouraging him to give the representatives who are traveling to Omaha his full attention and to meet with them personally, so that he may better understand the gravity and complexity of the impact his dams have on our river, our fishery and our community.

Please take a moment to write to: Warren E. Buffett, c/o Berkshire Hathaway, 3555 Farnam St., Omaha, NE 68131. E-mail dcray@brka.com, or leave a personal message for him at 402-346-1400.

Richard Salzman
Bayside

Salzman soliciting money again - via listserve

One of many in a series...
In a message dated 3/30/2007 10:44:39 AM Pacific Daylight Time, aeb@inreach.com writes:

http://www.upi.com/Energy/analysis_suit_adds_twist_to_klamath_dams/20070329-101219-9015r/

Analysis: Suit adds twist to Klamath dams
By HIL ANDERSON
UPI Correspondent

LOS ANGELES, March 30 (UPI) -- A California environmental group this week opened a new front in the battle to remove four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River that had become bogged down in a standoff over economic forecasts.
By alleging that a fish hatchery maintained at one of the four dams was actually damaging the Klamath salmon habitat with its waste products and toxic algae, Klamath Riverkeeper raised the ante in the process of issuing a new federal license to PacifiCorp, the company that operates the dams.

PacifiCorp is part of MidAmerica Energy, a subsidiary of Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway, a fact not lost on Klamath Riverkeeper as it appealed directly to the Oracle of Omaha's legendary business judgment.

"We call on Mr. Buffett to scrutinize PacifiCorp's operation of these dams and take action to prevent further devastation to the River and the salmon," the organization said in a news release this week. "Hopefully, our citizens' enforcement suit will be the first step in resolving these issues and restoring the Klamath River, and the communities that rely on the river, to what they once were."

Unspoken in the statement was the implication that shutting down the 40-year-old Iron Gate Dam hatchery would leave PacifiCorp without the cushion it provided in the form of salmon hatchlings to offset the loss of population wrought by the dam itself. And without that cushion, PacifiCorp might find it impossible to meet federal environmental regulations without taking the draconian step of removing the dams and allowing the Klamath to theoretically return to its "natural" pre-dam state.

The idea of tearing down hydroelectric dams on the Klamath and other western rivers has been a vision -- or a pipedream -- depending on one's view, of the ambitious notion that the electricity supply given up for the sake of white water and great fishing can be replaced without a significant impact on the regional economy.

The Klamath Hydroelectric Project is located on the California-Oregon border and has a capacity of 169 megawatts (MW). That is a fairly small output when compared to coal power plants, but nonetheless larger than most wind farms, and big enough to supply power to about 1.6 million customers. Proponents of western dam breaching contend that it is easy enough to replace the electricity produced by hydropower.

The cost of procuring power to replace cheap hydropower is an issue that depends on a number of economic variables; however, the bigger issue on the Klamath is the cost of accommodating the migrating Coho salmon, which are listed as a "threatened species."

The California Energy Commission this week issued a consultant's report that contended it would be cheaper for PacifiCorp and its ratepayers to close down the Hydroelectric Project than it would be to take on the cost of constructing the fish ladders that will likely be mandated by FERC in order for PacifiCorp to receive a new operating license.

"The ... report finds that mitigation to stop and begin reversing the environmental damage from the Klamath hydroelectric operations will cost between $230 and $470 million; power production will be reduced by 23 percent, and the project will be unable to provide quick power during peak periods of electricity demand," the Energy Commission said in the accompanying news release. "The PacifiCorp ratepayers will bear the greatest economic risk for unsuccessful mitigation strategies aimed at fisheries and water quality."

The Energy Commission report was a direct counterpoint to PacifiCorp's own estimates that relicensing the four dams and continuing to sell the electricity would actually save the company $46 million, even with the mitigation measures on behalf of the salmon.

"This is complex and not a simple matter of removing some concrete slabs," said PacifiCorp President Bill Fehrman. "This is low-cost power now used by our customers with virtually zero emissions. Taking the dams out will certainly cost money. Replacing the power will necessarily cost our customers more money, and potentially a lot more money."

There is also the issue of possibly toxic sediment that has built up behind the dams over the years that would be washed downstream if the dams were removed. As with the projections of the long-range costs of shutting down the dams or relicensing them, any level of certainty can appear fuzzy. But if a lawsuit could shut down the Iron Gate Dam hatchery or force PacifiCorp to pay for improvements, it would have a concrete impact on the size of the Klamath salmon population that would add to the liability side of the ledger.

---

Write to Mr. Buffett. Make it clear that no other alternative will be acceptable. The dams on the Klamath must come down. 

Warren E. Buffett c/o Berkshire Hathaway 3555 Farnam St. Omaha, NE 68131, email c/o dcray at brka.com
or leave a message for him at: (402) 346-1400.


copy your letters to: (Pacific Corp is owned by MidAmerica)
David L. Sokol CEO, MidAmerica P.O. Box 657, Des Moines, IA 50303-0657

---------

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/I/INTERIOR_SCIENTISTS?SITE=MOSTP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Mar 29,
Report raps Interior official over leaks

By JOHN HEILPRIN
Associated Press Writer


WASHINGTON (AP) -- A government official broke federal rules and should face punishment for leaking information about endangered species to private groups, the Interior Department's watchdog said.

The department's deputy assistant secretary for fish, wildlife and parks acknowledged releasing information that was not supposed to be made public to organizations such as the California Farm Bureau Federation and Pacific Legal Foundation, according to the agency's inspector general.

Environmentalists and other critics contend Julie MacDonald undermined federal endangered species protections. In the report by Earl Devaney, Interior Department officials describe MacDonald as a political appointee bent on manipulating science to fit her policy goals, which they said favor developers and industry.

The report said MacDonald:

-Removed more than 80 percent of almost 300 miles of streams that were to be protected to help bull trout recover in the Northwest's Klamath River basin.

-Tried to remove protections for a rare jumping mouse in the Rocky Mountains based on a questionable study.

-Pressured the Fish and Wildlife Service to alter findings on the Kootenai River sturgeon in Idaho and Montana so dam operations would not be harmed.

Interior Department spokeswoman Tina Kreisher said MacDonald was not immediately available for comment Thursday.

Rep. Nick Rahall, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, said he would hold a hearing in May about the report and the broader issues it raises.

The hearing will provide "a sweeping review on whether politics is infiltrating decisions" and subverting science in the government's handling of endangered species, said Rahall, D-W.Va., who released Devaney's report.

The findings were first reported in Thursday's New York Times.

Devaney said his office began investigating after an anonymous complaint in April 2006 that MacDonald acted unethically and illegally when she "bullied, insulted and harassed the professional staff" of the Fish and Wildlife Service to alter scientific evidence.

"A lot of that is true," Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dale Hall is quoted as saying in the report, adding that he has been in a "running battle" with MacDonald since he took over the service in October 2005.

Devaney said he uncovered no illegal activity by MacDonald. But he said she broke rules that prohibit the disclosure of private agency information and that require public officials to avoid appearing to give anyone preferential treatment.

Twice, according to the report, she sent internal Environmental Protection Agency documents to people whose e-mail addresses ended in chevrontexaco.com; ChevronTexaco was the name used after oil companies Chevron Corp. and Texaco Inc. merged in 2001, though it was changed to Chevron in 2005.

Devaney referred the matter to Interior Department officials for potential punishment. Kreisher said the report was under review and that officials would have no comment on a personnel issue.

MacDonald is a hydraulic engineer with a master's degree in management but no background in natural sciences. She joined the Bush administration in July 2002 as a senior adviser for fish, wildlife and parks. She was promoted to deputy assistant secretary in 2004.

"It's a travesty that a high-level political appointee with no training in biology is rewriting the conclusions of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists," said Melissa Waage, legislative director for the Center for Biological Diversity, an advocacy group.

---

On the Net:

Interior Department's inspector general: http://www.doioig.gov/

House Natural Resources: http://resourcescommittee.house.gov/

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3.29.2007

yougofree.com

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LAW OFFICE OF
JEFFREY DEAN SCHWARTZ
ATTORNEY AT LAW

360 Ritch Street Ste. 201
San Francisco, California 94107
415-777-3170
Humboldt County
Mendocino County

EXPERIENCE

Experience:
JEFFREY DEAN SCHWARTZ A California Lawyer who is a California Criminal Defense Attorney based in San Francisco. Serving as a San Francisco Attorney in the greater Bay Area, Humboldt County and all of Northern California, he is a seasoned Appellate Lawyer as well as a very experienced criminal trial lawyer. Mr. Schwartz is also closely associated with trusted and experienced colleagues in Southern California, who assist him locally for all criminal defense cases in Southern California, where he began his career before moving to San Francisco in 1992. A graduate of Columbia University in New York City and John Marshall School of Law in Chicago, he has been working exclusively as a criminal defense attorney since the early eighties.

First and foremost Mr. Schwartz is an experienced trial lawyer. He has tried numerous cases from the smallest misdemeanors to death penalty murders. His successes include acquittals or dismissals in just about every kind of case including murders, drug trafficking, domestic violence, white-collar crime, robbery and more.

Not only has Mr. Schwartz successfully tried a death penalty case, he has vast experience at appellate work including a death penalty appeal and habeas petition. His experience with appeals complements his in-court trial work adding an academic element often missing from one-dimensional trial attorneys. Mr. Schwartz says that dismissals come because of his keen knowledge of pretrial motions that lead to winning cases on legal technicalities. Acquittals come with talent, skill and complex trial experience. Talent, skill and complex trial experience is what Mr. Schwartz is all about. For some of the news gathering highlights of Mr. Schwartz' career, please refer to his web page entitled "Good News."

Education:
Columbia University, M.S., 1989
John Marshall Law School, J.D., 1979
California State University, B.A., 1974

Organizations/Past and Present
Admitted to the United States Supreme Court, California Supreme Court, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Central, Eastern and Northern California Federal District Courts, and all other California state courts.

Member of the California Supreme Court Death Penalty Panel, the First, Second and Fourth District Courts of Appeal appellate panels.

Member of the Murder/Death Trial Panel in San Francisco Superior Court.

Member of the California State Bar, Bar Association of San Francisco, National Lawyers Guild, California Attorneys for Criminal Justice and the National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys.

Board Member of the award winning Machen Community Center for Developing Minds in San Francisco.

Committee Member of the Sierra Club legal defense committee, retired.

Board Member of the Hollywood Bar Association, retired.

Teaching:
Associate Professor and Law Instructor, Chapman University, Orange 1990-92. Taught Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Legal Research & Writing and Business Law on an adjunct basis.

415-777-3170

home | news | legal | experience | e-mail | site map
attorney search | dui directory | link to us/add your site

Now handling Cyber Crime and Computer Fraud, as an Internet Fraud Lawyer, Jeffrey Dean Schwartz is one of the premier Criminal Defense Attorneys in San Francisco. From Misdemeanors to Murder, his criminal defense will level the playing field and he relishes getting good results. Below you will find just a few news clips about what Jeffrey Schwartz has accomplished in the criminal defense arena in California, San Francisco and the surrounding Bay Area.

Drug trafficking charges dismissed
The Desert Sun
"The District Attorney is going to have to bring in real people and real evidence." Jeffrey Schwartz, defense attorney.

Bus Driver acquitted of murder
The Desert Sun
"Justice has been served," said the defendant's twin sister who had waited outside the courtroom throughout the trial. "The evidence was very weak", defendant's attorney Jeffrey Schwartz said.

Valley man cleared by jury of July murder
The Press-Enterprise
A Superior Court jury yesterday cleared a Coachella man who had been accused of murder based on eyewitness accounts, including his daughter's. His defense attorney, Jeffrey Schwartz, argued for acquittal in his summation to the jury Thursday afternoon. The prosecution, he said, had charged the wrong man using unreliable evidence from unstable people.

Jury deadlocks in Defendant's trial for murder
The Press-Enterprise
An Indio jury deadlocked 9-3 yesterday in favor of the acquittal of the defendant on charges of murder, robbery and assault in an attack on two men last August in a Thermal vineyard. The mistrial was declared shortly after the testimony of the key prosecution witness was reread to the jury yesterday afternoon.

Convict claims court is unconstitutional his appeal objects to municipal court judges hearing superior court cases.
The Press-Enterprise
A man serving seven years in prison for shooting a Rancho Mirage man wants his conviction reversed, saying he was prosecuted by an unconstitutional court system in Riverside County. He is taking aim at the judge who sent him to the California Institution for Men at Chino. The argument was raised by Stamps' appellate attorney, Jeffrey Schwartz of San Francisco, in a brief filed last week with the state 4th District Court of Appeal in San Bernardino.

Deputy demoted after beating inquiry
The San Francisco Chronicle
A veteran San Francisco sheriff's deputy has been demoted in rank and suspended for 30 days after an investigation into allegations that he beat an inmate who threw water and feces in his face. Jeffrey Schwartz, the inmate's attorney, has filed a complaint with the U.S. Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, and a federal grand jury investigation is under way.

Full articles are available for review upon request.

3.28.2007

who signed on to the AEBs agenda?

note: This is not the ORIGINAL AEB website page, it has been modified many times.

Fancy prose hides the true purpose of the so called "Alliance for Ethical Business" - whose fearless leader was caught in an elaborate scheme of sending letters to the editor under phony names, the District Attorney gets cuaght submitting plagiarized "My Word's (Op-Eds) to the local papers, the lawsuit against PL that was the real reason for the "formation" of the AEB was tossed out without even meeting legal muster, and was revealed to have been concocted by one of the main activists leading the charge against the company - yeah, real ethical alright. But a good many of the people listed below were fooled. Many of them, however, are regular players in this game, the orks and true-believers:

Sign the Petition
To add your name please fill in the information below. If you'd like to help further [petitionx11.pdf|download the petition], print it, get signatures, then return it to AEB at P.O. Box 387, Eureka, CA 95502
Name
Address
Town/Neighborhood
eMail
Phone
We the undersigned are uniting to defend our laws, not only to protect our resources, but to protect the rights of those who play by the rules, exhibiting integrity, ethical behavior and a respect for community values. The duty of our District Attorney is to investigate and prosecute all violations of the law, including those of fraudulent or unfair business practices. We support the District Attorney's request to employ whatever means necessary to carry out his obligation to the citizens of Humboldt County.

Signed,
Nadananda, Redway
Kenneth A. Aab, Arcata
Jacqueline Aboulafia, Arcata
Michael Acosta, Cutten
Mike Adams, Arcata
Sean Adams, Arcata
Noel Adamson, Eureka
Alisha Adelmain, Arcata
Marianne Ahokas, Arcata
Mitsuko Akinaga, McKinleyville
Kenji Akinaga, McKinleyville
Lia Alcantara, Arcata
Monica Alcorn, Eureka
Ron Alexander, Arcata
Susan Alexander, Redway
Ryan Allard, Trinidad
Paula D. Allen, Eureka
Stephen Allen, Eureka
Thomas & Beth Allen, Grberville
Jenni Allen-San Giovanni, Eka
Laurynda Allison, Arcata
Patricia S. Alsup, PhD, Arcata
Royal E. Alsup, PhD, Arcata
Ann Alter, Kneeland
Marion Nina Amber, Eureka
Brian Amberson, Arcata
Greg & Becci Ames, Sny Brae
Carol Andersen, Bayside
Janice A. Andersen, Eureka
Ann Anderson, Trinidad
Eric Anderson, Eureka
John Angus, Redway
Sandy Antonson, Petrolia
Ryan Arellanes, Arcata
Celestine Armenta, Bayside
Michael W. Armstrong, Arcata
Karen Aronson, Arcata
Peter Aronson, Eureka
Eli Asarian, Arcata
L. Beth Askew, Eureka
James D. Athing, Arcata
Amanda L. Auston, Freshwater
Jennifer M. Ayo, McKinleyville
Hal Bahr, Redway
Tim Bailey, Arcata
Mikal Baker, Arcata
Polly Bambauer, Eureka
Beth Banner, Eureka
David Baraconi, Eureka
Michael Baraconi, Sierra Vista, CA
Phyllis Barba, Eureka
Vanessa Barienbock, Arcata
Bruce Barkley, Garberville
Laura S. Barney, Arcata
Linda Barney, Arcata
David Barrett, Arcata
Elizabeth Barrett, Scotia
Clinton Barricklow, Arcata
Dave Barry, Eureka
Samantha Bartlett, Eureka
Paul Bassis, Redway
Marilyn Bauer, Arcata
Wayne P. Bauers, Willow Creek
Emily Baum, Miranda
Sonia Baur, Garberville
Phillip M. Bawnsgard, Arcata
Gina Bealtie, Eureka
Sandra K. Bean, Eureka
Carole Beaton, Eureka
Monique Beaupre, Eureka
Diane F. Beck, Kneeland
Michael Beck, Bayside
Bella Becker, Arcata
Joan Becker, Redway
Deanna Beeler, Arcata
Craig Bell, Gualala
Jessica Bell, Blue Lake
Rebecca S. Bender, Arcata
Laura Benedict, Eureka
Carlos Benemann, Ferndale
Marilyn Benemann, Ferndale
Jeri Bennedetto, McKinleyville
Stephanie Bennett, Elk River
Rico Bennett, Elk River
Jerry Benton, Sacramento
Noelle Benzekri, Arcata
Chris & Richard Beresford, Arc
Jonas Berg, Bayside
Tigris Bergman, Arcata
George Bernard, Kneeland
Patricia S. Bernstein, Miranda
Emelia Berol, Arcata
Nadina Best, Eureka
Arthur Bettini, Arcata
Lisa Bianchi, Fieldbrook
Mark Bidaurreta, Eureka
Catharine M. Billey, McKville
Carl G. Birks, Eureka
N.M. Blacker, Arcata
Sarah Blair, Eureka
Barry Blake, Arcata
Peter Blakemore, Eureka
Nina Blasenheim, Petrolia
Greg Blomstrom, Westhaven
Karin Blumthal, Arcata
Tempra Board, Eureka
Frances Boettcher, King Salmn
Tim Bolton, Arcata
Heather Bonser-Bishop, Wsthvn
Earl R. Bootier, Arcata
Anna Mae Botley, McKinleyville
Robert Botley, McKinleyville
Greg Bourget, Arcata
Jere Bob Bowden, Ferndale
Bradley E. Bowman, Eureka
Bette M. Boyd, McKinleyville
Beverlee Bradshaw, Eureka
David Bradshaw, Eureka
Delores Brady, Eureka
Joan Brandon, McKinleyville
Andrea Brands, Arcata
Steve Brands, Arcata
Chris Brannan, Garberville
Susan Brater, Bayside
Timothy Brater, Bayside
Robert W. & Nancy Breslin, Trin
Zack Brewer, Arcata
Cassie Brilbeck, Eureka
Garrett Brinton, Bayside
Cara W. Brockhoff, McKville
Matt Brogdon, McKinleyville
Robert Brothers, Arcata
Jessica Brown, Arcata
Midge Brown, Arcata
Mijanou Brown, Bayside
Pamela Brown, Arcata
Joy Brownice, Arcata
Waylen Brucker, Arcata
Steve Brudney, Arcata
Thomas Bruner, Westhaven
Rayla Brunet, Arcata
Carol Bruno, Redway
Ellen Bryant, Eureka
Kristina Bryce, Eureka
Jeannie Bucher, McKinleyville
Anne Buffington, Eureka
Michael Bullock, Eureka
Debra Bullwinkle, Arcata
Mindy Bumgarner, Eureka
Kathie Bunnell, Arcata
Marty Burdette, Arcata
Petra Burgess, Eureka
A. Burka, Redway
James Burkholder, Redway
Rosanna Butka, Arcata
Donald F. Butler, Eureka
Edith F. Butler, Eureka
Shanna Butler, Arcata
Chris Butner, Arcata
Lisa Butterfield, Eureka
Michael Cahill, Arcata
Sally Call, Eureka
Patrick Callahan, Eureka
David Callow, Arcata
Heidi L. Calton, Eureka
Jeff Camp, Arcata
Dot Campbell, Eureka
Eric Campbell, McKinleyville
Jaclyn Campbell, Eureka
Jeremy P. Campbell, Arcata
Pascha Campbell, Hydesville
Richard Campos, McKinleyville
Glenn L. Cannon, Eureka
Neala Cantleberry, Eureka
Lisa Carbinelli, Arcata
Jeny Card, Freshwater
Earl John Carlson, Rio Dell
Erin Carlton, Eureka
Jane Carlton, Trinidad
Elizabeth Carlyle, Freshwater
Lorraine Carolan, Garberville
Ken W. Carpenter, Honeydew
Lisa Carpinelli, Blue Lake
David Carrington, Arcata
Lina Carro, Eureka
Charlene Carter, Arcata
David Carter, Eureka
Ethan Casaday, Arcata
Curt Caspin, Westhaven
Mary Susan Caston, Eureka
Ben Catching, Kneeland
Midge Catching, Kneeland
Phil Jams Catling, Trinidad
Patricia Catomer, Arcata
Jasmine Cerise, Arcata
Megan Cerri, Arcata
Kim Chamberlain, Fortuna
Emily Chambers,
Chris Chapin, Freshwater
Jocelyn Chapman, Trinidad
Joe Chapman, Arcata
Valerie Chapman, Samoa
Jennifer Chierici, Arcata
Bailey Christenson, Arcata
Andrew Christian, Arcata
Paul Cienfuegos, Arcata
Amanda Claire, Arcata
Amy Clark, Eureka
Frances Clark, Eureka
George Clark, Eureka
Jesse R. Clark, Fieldbrook
Laura Clark, Fortuna
Terry L. Clark, Arcata
Janelle Classen, Bella Vista
George Claus, Arcata
Earl R. Cleave, Petrolia
Janice Cleave, Petrolia
Colleen Clifford, Manila
Wesley Clingman, Fieldbrook
Kevin Clougherty, McKinleyville
Andrew J. Cochrane, M.D., Arc
Adrianne Coffman, Arcata
Robert S. Cogen, Eureka
Richard Cogswell, Petrolia
Joseph Cohee, Eureka
Rebecca Coker, Garberville
Jennifer Cole, Eureka
Wendy Cole, Eureka
Marian Coleman, Freshwater
Kevin D. Coles, Miranda
Halimah Collingwood, Arcata
John Collins, Canyon Country
Ken Collins, Kneeland
Pat Collum-Salafia, Trinidad
DHPL Collver, Fortuna
Brian Colman, Eureka
Liz and Kent Colwell, Grbrville
Denise O. Comiskey, Mckville
James P. Comiskey, Mckville
Christen Condry, McKinleyville
Li Conley
Elizabeth Conner, Arcata
Florence N. Consolati, Freshwtr
Jill Contreras, Arcata
Sarah Conversa, Eureka
Amy Conway, Redway
Chompers Cook, Petrolia
Greg Cook, Arcata
Alec Cooley
Gail Coonen, Freshwater
Curt Cooper, Westhaven
Jason Allen Copp, Trinidad
K. Corbett, Eureka
Jim Cord, Blue Lake
L. A. Cordero, Arcata
Andrew Cornell, Eureka
Rebecca Corrigan, Arcata
Diane Coughtry, Trinidad
Claire Courtney , Eureka
Brian Covert, Arcata
Colum & Monica Coyne, Rdway
Jeffrey R. Cozad, Loleta
Elaine Crandall, Eureka
Jessie Cretser, Arcata
Timothy Crlenjak, Eureka
Jeff Cronin, Arcata
Mike Crook, McKinleyville
Hillie Crowfoot, Petrolia
F.R. Culbertson, Kneeland
Dennis Cunningham, Trinidad
Paul Cunningham, Arcata
Linda Curran, Eureka
Michael Curran, Redway
Charley Custer, Redway
Lisa M. Cyrek, Garberville
Geneva D ?Adami, Arcata
Pat Dadigan, Trinidad
Susan & John Daniel, McKville
Patricia Daniels, McKinleyville
Patrick Daniels, McKinleyville
Marsha Davenport, Bayside
Liz Davidson, Redway
Tina Davies, Bayside
Andrea Davis, Myrtletown
Mike Davis, Arcata
Scott J. Davis, McKinleyville
Gabriel Day, Bayside
Sylvia De Rooy, Westhaven
Jennifer Deckard, McKinleyville
Beth Deibert, Eureka
Joy Dellas, Arcata
Marial Delo, Trinidad
Eugene C. Denson, Alderpoint
Jan Derksen, Miranda
Linda Derksen, Miranda
Sylvia DeRooy, Westhaven
Larry DeSantis, Eureka
W.B. Devall, Trinidad
Martha Devine, Eureka
Lisa M. DeWitt, Eureka
Alex Deye, Arcata
David P. Dibble, Eureka
May Dickmeyer, Arcata
Duke Diehl, Eureka
Kathleen Dillon, Redway
Ann C. Diver-Stamnes, Arcata
Soyka Dobush, Bayside
Steven Dodson, Kneeland
Susan Dodson, Kneeland
Phil Doerr, Arcata
Collie Doley, Arcata
Jason Domann, Arcata
Sidney Dominitz, Trinidad
Susanne Donahue, Trinidad
John H. Donahue, Trinidad
Mark & Jill Dondero, Orleans
Denny Dorsett, Arcata
Joe and Pat Dougherty, Fldbrk
Pam Dougherty, Redway
J. Dimitri Doumakis, Blue Lake
Alex Doye, Arcata
Joanne Dozelencic, McKville
Wendy Dresser, Arcata
Rocky Drill, Arcata
Arbold Dubrow, Arcata
Mark Dubrow, Arcata
David Dugan, Eureka
Nathan Dupre, Arcata
Pat DuRant, Eureka
Lezlee Dutton, Yreka
Libby Earthman, Myrtletown
Bill & Gail Eastwood, Redway
Jim Edman, Eureka
Daniel Edrich, Manila
Anna Eggleston, Eureka
Patrick Eggleston, Eureka
Adam Einhorn, Arcata
Larry Eitzen, Eureka
Jim Elferdink, McKinleyville
Ryan Emenaker, Arcata
Richard Engel, Arcata
Chris Enright, Arcata
Lynn Erickson, Trinidad
Marie M. Escher, Arcata
Robert Escher, Redway
Jo Escobar, Arcata
Dan Estetter, Eureka
Laura Estetter, Arcata
Bonnie Ety, Trinidad
Barry Evans, Eureka
Michael Evans, Garberville
Sterling Evans, Blue Lake
Robert B. Facer, Arcata
Vanessa Fadjo, Bayside
Rachel Farber, Arcata
Seth Farhi, Kneeland
Paul Farnham, Fortuna
Seth Farni, Kneeland
Jake Farrell, Arcata
Eileen Faulkner-Wolf, Arcata
Patricia Feeney, Arcata
Alicia Feigen, Horse Mountain
Kathleen Felley, Eureka
Michael Fennell, Manila
Janice Fetzer, Eureka
Oshy Fielder, Arcata
Michael Fields, West End Road
Dylan Fiero, Arcata
Jennifer Fischer, McKinleyville
Janet Fitzgerald, Garberville
Scott Fitzgerald, Arcata
Cole Fivenson, Arcata
Michael Fleming, Eureka
Tracy Fleming, Redway
Eric Fletcher, Arcata
Jamie Flower, Arcata
Angela Flynn, Arcata Bottoms
Jerry & Chantal Fontes, Eureka
Susie & Jimmy Foot, McKville
Joanne & Bob Fornes, McKville
Adam Forskie, Eureka
Marcy Foster, Eureka
Susan Fox, Trinidad
Sharon Fracker, Eureka
Amanda Brooke Freeman, Bsde
Andrew Freeman, McKinleyville
Brad Freeman, Arcata
Jack Freeman, Kneeland
Tracy Jordan French, McKville
Gil Friedman, Arcata
Joshua Frisbee, Arcata
Gabor Funk, Bayside
Lisa Furr, Eureka
Bob Fyre, Trinidad
Jason Gabriel, Bayside
Helen Renee Gale, McKville
Sarah Ganas, Arcata
Mike Gann, Arcata Bottoms
David S. Gans, M.D., Arcata
D. Lee Garrison, Eureka
Tina Garsen, Eureka
Bob & Mary Gearheart, Arcata
Yvonne Geiger, Eureka
Rhonda Geldin, McKinleyville
Phyllis J. Geller, Arcata
Rob Gellman, New Harris
Steve Gellman, Kneeland
Jana Genelly, Arcata
Carrie Gergits, Eureka
James Gergits, Eureka
Steve Gershenberg, Arcata
Mary Giardino, Redway
Alysia Gibbs, Cutten
Janne C. Gibbs, Eureka
Aila Gilbride-Read, Arcata
Anita Gilbride-Read, Fldbrook
Tim Gilbride-Read, Fldbrook
James F. Gily, Arcata
Barbara Glass, Fortuna
Lin Glen, Blue Lake
Kristi Gochoel, Briceland
Aaron R. Gold, Eureka
Carilyn Goldammer, Arcata
Larry Goldberg, Trinidad
Nora Golub, McKinleyville
Raymond Gomes, Arcata
Nelson Gonzalez, McKinleyville
Rodney Goodbrod, Kneeland
Cyndy Goodson, Ferndale
Joanne Grace, Trinidad
B. R. Graham, Redway
Heather Gramp, DowÕs Prairie
Trish & Ray Grantham, Eureka
Stacy Graves, Trinidad
Virginia Graziani, Redway
Kate & Simon Green, Trinidad
Mary Greene, Fortuna
Steven Greer, Eureka
Gilbert Gregori, Ettersburg
Dian Griffith, Redway
John Griffith, Fields Landing
Ben Grimes, Eureka
Gary L. Grinstaff, Eureka
Jim Groeling, Petrolia
Ray Gross, Eureka
Elaine Grosso, Eureka
Bart Gruzalski, PhD, Briceland
Cyril Gueguen, Arcata
Jane Gund, Redway
Suzanne Gurm, Eureka
Lisa Gust, Bayside
Micah Gustafson, McKinleyville
Morgan Gustafson, McKinleyville
Micah T. Gustafson, McKinleyville
Colinda Gutierrez, Kneeland
Attila Gyenis, Eureka
Teresa Haeg, Eureka
Beverly Hale, Arcata
Natalie Hall, Trinidad
Sommer Halligan, Arcata
Sara Hamill, Arcata
Anna Hamilton, Shelter Cove
Patricia Hamilton, Redway
Beverly Hanly, Westhaven
Tyler Hansen, Eureka
Mullaney Hardesty, Arcata
Joy Hardin, McKinleyville
Steve Harkey, Willow Creek
Vic Harmon, Freshwater
Vicki Harmon, Freshwater
Pamela J. Harper, Eureka
Ina K. Harris, Eureka
John E. Harris, Eureka
Mark P. Harris, Arcata
Debbie Harrison, Westhaven
Destere C. Harrison, Eureka
Beth Harrman, Arcata
Maureen Hart, Arcata
Chuck Harvey, Fieldbrook
Forrest Hassler, Arcata
Ginni Hassrick, Bayside
Chelsea Hastings, Arcata
Rachel Hatchimanji, Arcata
Becky Hatman, Bayside
Lloyd & Anne Hauskins, Redway
Debbra Haven, Arcata
Ellen Hawkins, Trinidad
Mary E. Haydon, Eureka
Jennifer Hayes, Arcata
Matt Hayes, Eureka
Aaron Hazard, Eureka
Nancy & Richard Head, Fortuna
Leslie Heald, Eureka
Cyndie Heart, Kneeland
Eric W. Hedlund, Eureka
Kristy Hellum, Arcata
Evaonne F. Hendricks, Arcata
Stan and Barbara Henerson, Arc
Terry W. Henkel, Arcata
Laura Hennings, Eureka
Roger Herick, Dow ?s Prairie
Arnold Heron, Eureka
Melissa M. Hessney, Eureka
Sally J. Hewitt, Arcata
Molly Hickey-Sinoway, Salmon Ck
Ron Hickey-Sinoway, Salmon Ck
Craig L. Hiler, Arcata
Susan Hiler, Arcata
Jesse James Hill, Arcata
Corby Hines, Arcata
Tom Hinz, Blue Lake
Martha Hirsch, McKinleyville
David F. Hitchcock, Arcata
Johny Hobson, Eureka
Somchai Hoffman, Arcata
Victoria Hoffman, McKinleyville
Ray Hofstetter, Fortuna
Erin Hogan, Eureka
Nancy Hogan, Trinidad
Robert A. Hoggard, Arcata
Frank Holladay, Arcata
Jessica Holloway, Arcata
Georje Holper, Seely Creek
Larry Holsen, Cutten
Cynthia Hooper, Eureka
Harold & Paula Horne, McKville
David Horwitz, Bayside
Freeman House, Petrolia
Alisa Howe, Blue Lake
JoAnn Howell, Cutten
Robert Hoyle, Mattole Valley
Dennis and Ellie Huber, Redway
Kent Huber, Eureka
Vonda Huffman, Eureka
John Hulburd, Redway
Mary Huskins, Redway
Shey Hyatt, Bayside
Joyce Icing, McKinleyville
Ben Irwin, Arcata
Nichole Irwin, Eureka
Cletus H. Isbell, Freshwater
Eileen S. Isbell, Freshwater
Nels Israelson, Arcata
Rita Jacinto, Willow Creek
Bill Jackson, Redway
Raechel Jackson, Eureka
Levi Jacobs, Arcata
Matt Jacobs, Arcata
Curtice Jacoby, Arcata
Mikal Jakubal, Briceland
Emily Janzen, Arcata
Dana M. Jensen, Ferndale
Marya A. Jensen, Arcata
Shanti Jensen, McKinleyville
Jinny Jernigan , Eureka
Fred C. Jewett Jr., Eureka
Aimee Johnson, Fortuna
Charlynn D. Johnson, Eureka
Chris Johnson, Arcata
Erika Johnson, Eureka
Kathryn C. Johnson, McKinleyville
Leif Johnson, Arcata
Luke I. Johnson, Arcata
Rikkie Johnson, Arcata
Sheri Johnson, Freshwater
Julie Jones, Arcata
Lenna Jones, Eureka
Roger Jones, Eureka
Laura & Brian Julian, Blue Lake
Jeanette Jungers, Eureka
Laura Kadlecik, Arcata
Stephen Kamelgarn, Kneeland
Robert Kammerer, McKinleyville
Brian Kaneko, Arcata
Elaine Kaple, Arcata
Marvin Karno, M.D., Fieldbrook
Nelson Kass, McKinleyville
Tracy Katelman , RDF, Eureka
Debra Kaufman, Bayside
Dawn K. Kauhi, Eureka
Scott Kearney, Eureka
Maureen Kearns, McKinleyville
Michael Keefe, Arcata
Kelly Keen, Arcata
Amy Keenan, Arcata
Marie Kelleher-Roy, Trinidad
Roz Keller, Eureka
Jherine Kellerman, Arcata
James Kelly, Westhaven
Kathie Kelly, Arcata
Nate Kempe, Garberville
Dorrie Kennedy, Whitethorn
Maureen Kerns, McKinleyville
Luke Kibbee, Arcata
Francis Kilkenny, Arcata
Siddiq & Matina Kilkenny, Arcata
Joshua Kinch, Freshwater
Aurora King, Eureka
Elisa King, Arcata
Joyce King, McKinleyville
L. Sydney King, Redway
Anne Kinne, Arcata
Eric V. Kirk, Redway
Jana Kirk-Levi, Redway
George Kirkpatrick, Freshwater
Chris Kirsch, Eureka
Elmone & Rich Kissling, Eureka
Kjersti Kjeisbu, Arcata
Kara Lynn Klarner, Cutten
Rick Klein, Redway
Siena Klein, Miranda
Seth Klempner, Arcata
Larry Kline, Arcata
Gina R. Klump, Eureka
James A. Klump, Petrolia
Jim Klump, Petrolia
Ann Knight, Loleta
Jennifer Knight, West Haven
Ron Kokish, Trinidad
Michele Konnersman, McKville
Wendy Kopilik, Eureka
Ginger Kossow, Kneeland
Steven D. Kossow, Arcata
Phaedra Kossow-Quinn, Arcata
Ralph & Nona Krause, Eureka
Kathleen & Rus Krauss, Arcata
Bridgett Kroemer, Eureka
J. Krupe, Orick
Kristina Kruse, M.F.A., Willow Crk
Heather Kueppemak, Arcata
Linda M. Kuhn, Orick
Michael Kunz, Arcata
Van Kupilik, Eureka
Richard La Forge, Eureka
Cherry K. LaForge, Kneeland
Todd Lake, Arcata
Jim Lamport, Blocksburg
Danika Landgraf, Bayside
Amy and Philippe Lapot, Kneeland
Jane Lappiner, Petrolia
Valerie A. Larson, Trinidad
Thomas Lasbury, Phillipsville
Pandora Lathrop, Eureka
Nicole Lawrence, Arcata
Duane B. Leal, Eureka
Mike Leeman, Arcata
Jessi Leimer, Arcata
Jim Lennon, Arcata
Edwin S. Lettnecker, Eureka
Eva Lettnecker, Eureka
Rebecca Leuning, Arcata
Laurie Levey, Willow Creek
Lauren Levy, Willow Creek
Michael Levy, Arcata
Tryphena Lewis, Arcata
Eric Liberatore, Arcata
Edmund J. Light, Eureka
Donna & Chi-Wei Lin, Trinidad
Nicole Lindley, Eureka
Anne Lindquist, Trinidad
Kathy Lindstrom, Salmon Creek
Peter Lindstrom, Salmon Creek
Sebastian Link, Arcata
Lewis Litzky, Arcata
Antonio Llanos, Bayside
Shannon Lockwood, Eureka
Candice Lodlow, Arcata
Paul Lohse, Eureka
Nate Lomba, Eureka
Jasmine Loucks, Arcata
Mark Lovelace, Sunny Brae
Lowder-Cole Family, McKinleyville
Leon Lowrey, Eureka
Abby Lubowe, Arcata
Dream Lucas, Arcata
Candice Ludlow, Arcata
Jennifer Lumbert, Westhaven
Jan Lundberg, Arcata
Helen Lutz, McKinleyville
Yvonne Lyell, Arcata
Karin Lynch, Arcata
Suzanne Lyon, Blue Lake
Mary Ann Lyons, Arcata
Bradley Mack, Arcata
Amber Mackenzie, Arcata
Debra MacQueen, Kneeland
Joseph Macturk, Eureka
Don Maddox, Arcata
Carl Magruder, Arcata
Jack & Lee Maguire, Garberville
John Mahan, Eureka
Kiva Mahoney, Arcata
Linda Mahoney, Arcata
Shea Mahoney, Arcata
Erica B. Makino, McKinleyville
Marie Maloney, McKinleyville
Xandra Manns, Eureka
Kathryn Lobato Manspeaker,
David K. March, Eureka
Jan Maricia, Redway
Patricia Marien, Arcata
Kathy Marshall, Arcata
Jerry Martien, Manila
Molly Martin, Westhaven
Grace Marton, Arcata
Jan Mathews, Eureka
Janna Matteoli, Arcata
Brian Mau, Dow ?s Prairie
Barbara Mayhn, Eureka
Amanda M. Maynard, Redway
Libby Maynard, Eureka
John & Darsty McAlinn, Arcata
Melinda McComb, Trinidad
Bob McCombs, Bayside
Jean McCord, Eureka
Praline McCormack, McKinleyville
Maureen McCready-Glassman, Arc
Mike McCurdy, Bayside
Carol McFarland, Arcata
Tamara McFarland, Eureka
Eileen McGee, Eureka
Peter McIntosh, Arcata
Tim McKay, Westhaven
Robert C. McKee, McKinleyville
Ronald K. McKee, Eureka
Maya McKenzie, Eureka
Melvin A. McKinney, Cutten
Melissa McKinnon, Arcata
Jolleen McLeod, Arcata
Susan & Bob McPherson, Bayside
Jean McTimmins, Eureka
Sarah L. Meece, Eureka
Gregory T. Mellon, McKinleyville
Linda F. Mellon, McKinleyville
Marcia M. Mendels, Miranda
Alexa Mercado, Arcata
Jed A. Mercado, Arcata
Jesse Mestemacher, Arcata
Keytra Meyer, Arcata
Naomi Meyer, McKinleyville
Carl K. Meyers, McKinleyville
J. Michael, Arcata
Ann Michelini, Miranda
Dustin Michelletti, Arcata
Nancy Michik, McKinleyville
Jody Mielke, Eureka
Robert Mikeshin, Eureka
Samuel Miles, Fortuna
Chad M. Miller, Arcata
Marion Miller, Kneeland
Mary M. Miller, Freshwater
Ron & Jill Miller, Bayside
Charles Minton, Bayside
Leeza Mironova, Arcata
Jane I. Mishica, Arcata
Brent S. Mitchell, Eureka
Shelley Mitchell, Arcata
Paul Mollard, Eureka
Jay Moller, Garberville
Adam Molofsky, Arcata
Carol Mone, Trinidad
George Monroe, Salmon Creek
Jack Monschke, Miranda
Joel Monschke, Miranda
Jonell Friedkin Monschke, Mranda
Dr. Elizabeth Montague, Grberville
Taun Moondy, Redway
Barb & Damien Mooney, Kneeland
Chris Moore, Arcata
F. Suzanne Moore, Eureka
Mary Moore, Eureka
Pat Morales, Trinidad
Patrick Moran, Arcata
Robert Moran, Eureka
Tom & Tam Moreland, Miranda
Kathy Morris, Arcata
Susan Morrison, McKinleyville
S. Moses, Trinidad
Leyna Mott, Arcata
Stan Mott, Blue Lake
Marsha Moyer, Arcata
Christy Mueller, Eureka
Jean & Jack Munsee, McKville
Diana Munzer, Eureka
Nicole Murano, Arcata
Sky Murphy, Arcata
Margo Musser, Eureka
Jesse Myers, Fieldbrook
Melinda Myers, Bayside
Conrad Nagahiro, Arcata
Chris Nance, Arcata
David Narum, Arcata
Wanda & David Naylor, Eureka
Lindsay M. Neal, Manila
Reed Neely, McKinleyville
Jessica Neill, Eureka
Earl B. Nere, Arcata
Gwen L. Neu, Eureka
Samuel Neuwirth, Bayside
Kristin Nevedal, Redway
Kate L. Newby, Eureka
Alison Nichols, Arcata
Pete Nichols, Arcata

Ward Nickle, Blue Lake
Dana Nielsen, Sunny Brae
Kimberly Nies, Arcata
Heather Nikolauson, Eureka
William Nolan, Eureka
Nancy Norman, Eureka
Mi-Kf ? ?nfc Michael Norton, Eureka
Jack L. Nounnan, Arcata
Indio Nzila, Arcata
Mary O ?Brien, Whitethorn
Meighan O ?Brien, Manila
Charmian O ?Connor, Kneeland
Pete O ?Connor, Bayside
Jonathan O ?Keefe, Arcata
Jan O ?Neill, Bayside
Tommie Offord, Arcata
Bruce Ogata, McKinleyville
Benjamin Okin, Eureka
Felicia Oldfather, McKinleyville
Jennifer Oliver, Eureka
Patrick M. Oliver, Blue Lake
Ginger Olsen, Eureka
Arleen Olson, Redway
Carrie Olson, Bayside
Julia Olson, Arcata
Danielle Opalach, McKinleyville
Alex Orion, Manila
Rita Orlandini, Eureka
Ansel Ortiz, Arcata
G.Z. Ortiz, McKinleyville
Ursula Osborne, Arcata
Janet Ostridge, Fortuna
Jeff Overveen, Arcata
C. Tyler Oxford, Bayside
Karen Paff, Petrolia
Michael Pahl, Eureka
Marilyn Paik-Nicely, McKinleyville
Tim Paik-Nicely, McKinleyville
Juli Palmer, Arcata
Jane Parick, Arcata
Joanne Parkhurst, Arcata
Maggie Parkhurst, Eureka
Peter B. Parnell, Eureka
Judith Pasko, McKinleyville
Becky Paterson, Blocksburg
Melvin B. Pearlston, Trinidad
Patricia Pearson, Trinidad
Robin Peffenberger, Hydesville
D. Ray Pemberton, McKinleyville
Arthur James Pena Jr., Arcata
Jeanne Pendergast, Arcata
Gina Pennington, Bayside
Barbara Penny, Briceland
Cassandra Pensa, Arcata
Sarah A. Pepito, McKinleyville
Paul J. Perkins Jr., Eureka
Benjamin Perone, Orick
Tom Perrett, Arcata
Kristina Perry, Arcata
Brenda Peterson, Manila
Jennifer A. Petolla, Arcata
Heidi Peura, McKinleyville
Kim Phelps, New Harris
Karen Phillips, Eureka
Fhyre Phoenix, McKinleyville
Paul Pitino, Arcata
Stephen Plant, Arcata
Sam Polly, McKinleyville
Tobin Poppenberg, Eureka
Jenece E. Poree, Eureka
Cythia Poten, Orleans
Donley B. Powell, Indianola
W. J. Powell, Arcata
Robert Poyourow, Bayside
Louise Prange, Fortuna
M. Prat, Trinidad
William G. Prescott, Arcata
Elizabeth Price, Blue Lake
Carol N. Pridgeon, Arcata
Mark Pringle, Trinidad
Gayle Pritchard-Peterson, Whthrn
Tera Prucha, McKinleyville
Jenny Pschaida, Eureka
Kim L. Puckett, Arcata
Anna Purna, Arcata
Greg Quast, Arcata
Dana Quillman, Arcata
Leslie Quinn Family, Blue Lake
Jack Quirey, Freshwater
Aveeda Rada, Eureka
Joyce Radtke, Sunny Brae
Ashley Rahll, Arcata
Ayala Rahm, Arcata
Leila Raim, Eureka
Salina E. Rain, Blue Lake
Karen K. Ramsey, Eureka
Tim Randles, Arcata
Randall B. Rasmussen, Eureka
Carl Ratner PhD., Trinidad
Ian Rawlinson, Arcata
Heather Rawson, Arcata
Violet Rose Ray, Arcata
Carolyn Real, Fieldbrook
Michael S. Redd, Eureka
Caitlin Reed, Arcata
Carl Reese, McKinleyville
Autumn L. Reid, Eureka
Kelly Reid, Eureka
W.M. Remme, Garberville
Julia Remmenga, Arcata
Rebecca Reniero, Eureka
Andy Retlogle, Eureka
Jennifer Rice, Eureka
Kerry & Stephen Rice, Eureka
Melissa Richard, Arcata
Sarah Richards, Eureka
Nathalie Richcreek, Arcata
Nick Ricker, Cutten
Todd Ridgley, Arcata
Susan Riesel, Bayside
Justin Riggs, Arcata
Patrick Riggs, Scotia
Wendy Ring, Bayside
David Rippner, Garberville
C. Ritter, McKinleyville
Carly Robbins, Eureka
Bradley Roberts, Eureka
Ruth E. Robertson, Eureka
Scott Robinson, Blue Lake
Shannon Robinson, Miranda
Bud Rogers, Redway
Elizabeth A. Rogers, Ferndale
Jerry & Gisela Rohde, Eureka
Stacey M. Rohrbaugh, Redway
Pasquale Romano, Arcata
Connie Rose, Bayside
Jordan Rose, Garberville
Melanie Rose, Eureka
Michael Rose, Arcata
Liese G. Rosenblum, Redway
Heather Roseup, Arcata
Heather Ross, Arcata
Jared Rossman, Redway
Zach Rouse, Blue Lake
Joanne Rowland, Eureka
Charlie Rudd, Arcata
Jennifer N. Russ, McKinleyville
Howard Russell, Freshwater
Jacqueline Sleeper Russell, McKv
Lynn Ryan, Arcata
Peter Ryce, Briceland
Deborah Sabin, Arcata
Rob Sadler, Loleta
Brandon A. Salus, Garberville
Richard Salzman, Trinidad
Karin Salzmann, Trinidad
Alan Sanborn, Arcata
Mark Paul Sanderson, Trinidad
Samual Sanford, Arcata
Edward J. Sankovich, Bayside
Thomas Saunders, Arcata
Ester Saunoras, Petrolia
Pearla Saus, Eureka
Jennifer Savage, Manila
Sandra Schaff, Kneeland
Stephen G. Schaffer, Eureka
Judith Scharnberg, Arcata
Gordon Schatz, Korbel
Sondra Schaub, Arcata
Victor Schaub, Arcata
Richard Scheinman, Petrolia
Sarah Scher, Eureka
Rob Scherer, Arcata
Joan Schirle, Blue Lake
Alyssa Schmidt, Eureka
Jay & Kumi Schock, Eureka
Beth Schultz, Arcata
Kay Schulz, Trinidad
R. Scott, Bayside
Trey Scott, Arcata
Robyn Scroeder, McKinleyville
Judy Sears, Arcata
Mike Seeber, Eureka
Susan Seeger, McKinleyville
Lawrence Seeger, McKinleyville
Jayme Seehafer, McKinleyville
Elizabeth Segal, Bayside
M. H. Segal, Bayside
Richard Self, Arcata
Harmony Sellers, Garberville
James L. Selter, McKinleyville
Patricia Sennott, Trinidad
Rick Sessions, Eureka
Sean Sexton, Arcata
Margaret Shaffer, Eureka
Kristi Shanoff, Arcata
Sarah Shapiro, Arcata
Kevin Sharkey, Bayside
Chip Sharpe, Bayside
Edward Sheffeid, Arcata
Joe & Gale Sheflin, McKinleyville
Karen Shepherd, Arcata
Scott L. Sherman, M.A., L.M.F.T.
Joseph Shermis, Eureka
Emily Shernock, Arcata
Ralph Sherrow, Hayward
Steven D. Show, Arcata
Barbara Shults RN
Pamela Sicklesteel, Zenia
Glen Sicklesteel, Zenia
Cindy Siemens, McKinleyville
Andy Sikorra, Eureka
Naomi Silvertree, Trinidad
Eric Simons, Manila
David Simpson, Petrolia
Suzanne Simpson, Arcata
Hayley Sirrine, Eureka
Michael Sisco, Fortuna
Donalynn Sjostrand, Eureka
Bruce Slightom, Eureka
Tisha Sloan, Blue Lake
Brian Smith, Bayside
Cambria Smith, Arcata
Douglas Smith, Arcata
James A. Smith, Arcata
Jason Smith, Arcata
Kristina Smith, Arcata
Robyn Smith, Arcata
Tamra Smith, Eureka
Zachary Smith, Eureka
Teresa Snell-Feikema, Arcata
C. Caroline Snow, Arcata
Charlie Solo, Petrolia
Michael Sonn, Eureka
Selma H. Sonntag Sr., Arcata
Kaitlin Sopoci-Belknap, Eureka
James M. Sorter, Arcata
Margaret Noel Soucy, Arcata
Autumn Spears, Trinidad
Maria Spetzler, Eureka
Patricia Spillane, Arcata
Janet Spitzer, Eureka
Paul Spragens, Arcata
Dave Spreen, Kneeland
Daniel R. Stafford, Eureka
Mary Carolyn Stafford, Eureka
Stephen P. Stamnes, Arcata
Phyllis Stanewick, Arcata
Richard J. Stanewick, Arcata
Mary Stanleigh, Eureka
Bea Stanley, Trinidad
Tommie L. Stanley, Eureka
Dean Stanton, Eureka
Shena R. Staples, Eureka
Sara & Peter Starr, Arcata
Ernie Stegeman, Arcata
Stacy Stein, Fortuna
Mike Stengl, Blue Lake
Marika Stephanos, Bayside
Sandy Stephens, Arcata
Peter Stern, Redway
Kenneth Stevens, Eureka
Paul Stevenson, Arcata
Amy Stewart, Eureka
Alex Stillman, Arcata
Sue & Jim Stinson, Trinidad
Kelly Stirling, Arcata
Harlo Stompro, Arcata
Darla Stone, Eureka
Jesse Stone, Arcata
Richard Stoney, Arcata
Darryle L. Story, Freshwater
Jeremy Stout, Blue Lake
Michael W. Stowell, Hydesville
Mickey Strang, McKinleyville
Laura & Marcus Strange, McKville
Mark Stratman, Myrtletown
Judy Stromberg, Eureka
Allegra Stroup, Arcata
Michael Strykowski, Arcata
Felix Stumpf, Redway
Bill Sturgeon, Petrolia
Sharon K. Stussman, McKville
Gretchen Sudlow, Blue Lake
Robert Sutherland, Ettersburg
Frank L. Swan, Eureka
Holly Sweet, Redway
Evan Swimke, Arcata
Elizabeth Swingdler, Eureka
Lynn Szabo Pa-C, Blue Lake
Daniel Tainow, Arcata
Jay Tallman, Eureka
Yomaira Tamayo, Woodhaven
Daniel Tangney, Arcata
Marcia & Simeon Tauber, Arcata
Joyce C. Taylor, Arcata
Rev. Richard E. Taylor, Eureka
Roxana Taylor, Arcata
Scott Tenney, Weott
Eleanore Tennyson, McKinleyville
Todd Tennyson, McKinleyville
Robie Tenorio, Ettersburg
John Teply, Eureka
Elizabeth Terdecki, Willow Creek
Michael Terdecki, Willow Creek
Randy Terra, Arcata
Jim Test, Arcata
Joshua B. Thayer, Arcata
Paulette Anderson Thiele, Redway
Traci Bear Thiele, Garberville
Brian Thomas, McKinleyville
Carl Thomas, Eureka
John C. Thomas, Arcata
Karyn Lee Thomas, Redway
Patti D. Thomas, Arcata
Andrew Thompson, Arcata
Bill Thompson, Bayside
Bradley L. Thompson, Arcata
Jane Thompson, Bayside
Julie Thompson, Blue Lake
Yvonne Thompson, Bayside
Andrew Thomson,
Pam Threatt, Freshwater
Don Tiley, Fields Landing
Kathleen Tillinghast, Eureka
Rev. H. A. ?Bud ? Tillinghast, Eka
Chip and Sarah Tittman, Miranda
Beverly Titus, McKinleyville
Luann Titus, Garberville
Rick Tomar, Garberville
David Tonn, Arcata
Tracy Torwetta, Arcata
Jose Tovar, Arcata
Mitch Trachtenberg, Trinidad
Elise Trent, Arcata
Celeste Trepanier, McKinleyville
Jenny & Bill Trewartha, Eureka
Jason Trine, Eureka
Alice Tromba, Kitty Hawk
Mr. Trust, Freshwater
Dave Tschoepe, Arcata
Jan Turner, Arcata
John Tutuska, Eureka
Michael Twombly, Bayside
Susan Twomey, Freshwater
Julia Uhlendorf, Arcata
Nancy Ungar, Trinidad
Chad Unger, Arcata
Eduardo Urbina, Fortuna
Celia Utman, Arcata
Ed & Aiko Uyeki, McKinleyville
Robert C. Van Fleet, Eureka
Susie Van Kirk, Bayside
John H. Van Lieu, Eureka
Carol Van Sant, Briceland
Matt Vandevert, Eureka
Stan Vanella, Arcata
Solenne Vanne, Arcata
Mariah VanZerr, Bayside
Melissa Vatic, Arcata
Vic Vega, Arcata
Dave Vegliano, Bridgeville
Carlos Velasco, Loleta
Karl Verick, Redway
William Verick, Westhaven
Richard Verseput, McKinleyville
Lucille Vinyard, Trinidad
Liv Visgirda, Arcata
Kristin M. Vogel, Garberville
Kurt Volckmar, Garberville
Melissa Voures, Arcata
Nezzie Wade, Eureka
Leon & Jean Wagner, McKville
Jesse Waldon, Eureka
Doug Wallace, Redway
Karrie Wallace, Arcata
Marni Waller, Arcata
Catherine Walling, Ferndale
Richard Walter, Trinidad
Kathryn Walton, Eureka
Ellen Warner, Redway
Tim Warner, Arcata
Lindsay Washington, Arcata
Christopher Watt, McKinleyville
Jacob Wegelin, Davis
Erik Weibel, Trinidad
David Weinstein, Arcata
Jo Weisberger, Eureka
Mary Jo Weisgerber, Eureka
Roger & Anne Weiss, Bayside
Michael Welch, Fieldbrook
Amber L. Wells, Fortuna
Lynne Wells, Bayside
Roberta E. Welty, Eureka
William R. Wendschlag, Eureka
William-Charles Wenham, Arcata
Craig J. Weyrick, Eureka
Ryanne Wheeler, Eureka
Michael Wheelock, Arcata
May Fowlkes Wheetley, Arcata
Matt Whisenhunt, McKinleyville
Ann White, Eureka
Corby N. White, Arcata
Rex White, Garberville
Robert G. White, PhD, Arcata
Barbara Whitener, Manila
Susan Whitney, Trinidad
Elizabeth Who, Arcata
John & Carol Wiebe, Westhaven
Jesse Wiedel, Eureka
Jim Wilde, Garberville
Bunny Wilder, Miranda
James A. Wilkie, Arcata
Seanna Willett, Arcata
Jessica Willhite, Eureka
Brenda S. Williams, Arcata
Cai Williams, Eureka
Kit Croshy Williams, Arcata
Lawrence Williams, Trinidad
Minerva Williams, Arcata
Russ Williams, Blue Lake
Sonja Williams, Arcata
Bryan Willis, Arcata
David C. Willis, Eureka
S. Brian Willson, Arcata
Jason Wilson, Arcata
Andy Wineberg, Arcata
Philip Winkels, McKinleyville
Kimberly Winter, Eureka
Marina Winthers, Miranda
Mark & Carolyn Winthers, Redway
Leelow Wisemyn, Loleta
Catherine Wisniewski, Eureka
Joanne Witte, Eureka
Justine M. Witte, Fortuna
Floyd Wixon, Arcata
Suzanne Wolbert, Eureka
Denise Wood, Trinidad
Mara Woodcock, Arcata
Larry Wright, Eureka
Linda A. Wright, Eureka
Beth A. Wylie, Eureka
Jeanne York, Redway
Robert Yosha, Petrolia
David R. Young, McKinleyville
Kenneth C. Young, Petrolia
Pinky Zalkin, McKinleyville
Rachel Zell, Arcata
Marilyn Zizza, Eureka
Michael Zizza, Eureka
Richard M. Zoah-Henderson, Eka
Xandy Zublin-Meyer, Arcata
Seth Zuckerman, Petrolia

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The Alliance for Ethical Business

Humboldt County is one of the greatest places on earth. With our dramatic seascapes, our temperate climate, our magnificent forests and our small-town culture, Humboldt is truly one of America's hidden gems.

But for the people of Humboldt to retain our high quality of life we need a strategy to create good, new jobs that protect our communities and respect the natural environment. For too long we have allowed outside companies to abuse our trust and disrespect the community.

The Alliance for Ethical Business believes that Humboldt can grow and attract ethical businesses in a range of industries, including agriculture, manufacturing, sustainable forestry, crafts, and tourism.

Sign-up here for action alerts so you can take action today for a prosperous and beautiful Humboldt County.

We recommend you visit Healthy Humboldt's for updates and information about the General Plan Update process at: http://www.HealthyHumboldt.org.

For information on the effort by powerful corporate interest to use our precious remaining bay-front property for a big box development that will threaten our locally owned businesses and kill jobs, we recommend you visit: BalloonTrackWatch.org.